OLP 016: Strawberry Bros Forever – Transcript

OLP 016: Strawberry Bros Forever audio

Introduction (00:00:00):
[Intro audio: “There is a Dark Place,” by Tom Rosenthal]

Jordan (00:28):
Hi, I’m Jordan.

Lex:
And I’m Lex!

Jordan:
And we are back at it again at the Krispy Kreme! 

Lex:
Yeah, welcome back to the shit-for-brains podcast. 

Jordan:
We’re still here casting it up. We still got ADHD. 

Lex:
Yeah, we, we still definitely do have ADHD. We have ADHD, so good. 

Jordan:
So good [singing] 

Lex:
Okay. All right.

Jordan:
I got you. [singing] I knew that I would now.

Lex:
Okay, so, uh, it’s been a time y’all. 

Jordan:
About a month to be precise. 

Lex:
It, yeah, it’s been a month and boy, has it been a month! 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
Just some, like, quick insight, you know, like, we, we want to maintain, like, some boundaries as you know, like, between our private life and what we talk about on the podcast. It may not seem like that, but we do, we do have boundaries that we don’t cross on, on recording. So, I’m going to keep it brief, but, like, I had a bad month and we felt, both of us, that it was important to give space to that. And talk about that a little bit before just jumping back in like this wasn’t a, like, we’re gonna take a break so we can come back with surprises. It was, like, uh, I need a break from everything, please, dear God. And then Jordan was like, [bleep] yeah. And then took that opportunity to, like, start some other cool shit for y’all. So, that was like, it was a two birds, one stone. 

Jordan:
Yeah. We both kind of needed the chance in different ways to get our feet back under us. So.

Lex:
Yes, yes. 

Jordan:
That’s what we’ve been doing, but we’re happy to be back. 

Lex:
Yeah, for sure. Very happy to be back. You know, we are still the, as I said, shit-for-brains podcast that you know and love, or at least, like, have heard of, maybe, and don’t hate. 

Jordan:
Now 100% more shit. 

Lex:
Yeah, no brain cell, only shit.
Jordan (02:13):
Just shit. Yeah, I can’t follow that. 

Lex:
No, I mean, yeah, that was, that was a pretty shitty ‘yes and’ on my part. 

Jordan:
We’re going to do the puns right off the bat, I see. 

Lex:
Listen, I don’t know why you’re giving me that face or that attitude because you’re normally the one that comes with that punny energy. So, I feel like I’m long overdue to balance the scales here. 

Jordan:
That’s fair. 

Lex:
That’s the real reason I wanted a hiatus. You wanted to work on the marketing for our podcast. Well, I studied the pun. 

Jordan:
And that’s what you got? 

Lex:
Okay. Listen, are you gonna be mad about the pun? Are you gonna, like, rag on the pun? Like, who’s, who’s stopping the ‘yes and’ now, huh? Theater degree person. Hmm? Hmm? I thought you were a bachelor of the arts, of theater.

Jordan:
I’m a bachelorette of the arts, excuse you.

Lex:
Sorry. Bachelor of Fine Arts, BFA. Ohh.
Jordan: (03:02):
I want to be super clear that I am not the person who said no, it’s a BFA, in this situation. 

Lex:
Yeah. I thought you would- 

Jordan:
I just I want to put on the record that I don’t ever want to be that person.
Lex (03:15):
I thought you would. So, I did it for you when you didn’t.
Jordan (03:19):
That’s not great for my brand.
Lex (03:20):
Uh, well your brand is pretty well solidified, I’d say. I think we’re both pretty, uh, we’ve dug our proverbial graves and we are in them. [Inaudible]
Jordan (03:29):
We’re climbing back out to make a podcast for you.
Lex (03:31):
Honestly we can just, like, take a nap. Like, we’re just chilling down there. I’m just vibing. Can still make a podcast and probably actually better to do the podcasts in the graves. Probably great insulation. 

Jordan:
This is true, this is true. 

Lex:
There’s a lot of dirt that we can just, like, touch while recording. 

Jordan (03:48):
Two dudes [inaudible] five feet apart. ‘Cause they’re separate graves.
Lex (03:51):
Built in worms in the walls. We just need Bob Saget and we’ll be set.
Jordan (03:54):
There we go. It all comes back around.
Lex (03:57):
It all comes back around. Yeah. So, welcome back. Thanks for your patience. I’m sure y’all get it. I don’t know anyone in my life who’s not burnt out right now. So, thanks for your patience. And if you’re upset with us, I’m sort of sorry, but not really, ‘cause-
Jordan (04:12):
Maybe, maybe you should find a grave and take a little nap.
Lex (04:15):
Yeah. Like, not in the threatening way that that was implied. Like, within the context of our earlier bit. Please do, lawyers please do take note. Please be quiet. 

Jordan:
That was not, uh, violence. 

Lex:
It was, uh, take a nap. Yeah. So, all that said, I just wanted to be transparent about why we decided to go on a break and I just really needed a little bit of time. And, you know, Jordan said too, that we, we both just needed to come up for air. As they say. So, with that though, Jordan did do some really cool shit, you know, over our hiatus and has some other stuff planned. Like, did a lot of brainstorming and creativity, sorta things. ‘Cause she’s so cool. Um, so, so now you get to listen to her tell you all these really cool things and um, I’m personally very excited for all of you, very much. And I am still very happy to be doing a podcast with you.
Jordan (05:05):
I love you too. Thank you for that very, very kind introduction. 

Lex:
Hey, bro.
Jordan (05:09):
I feel like-

Lex:
Hey, bro.

Jordan:
What? 

Lex:
I [bleep] love you.

Jordan:
I [bleep] love you too, bro. 

Lex:
Nice, nice! Tight, buddy! Sick, buddy. 

Jordan (05:18):
Nice, buddy. Anyways. I feel like I’m going to be a little disappointing now coming in and being, like, yeah, so I made a bunch of spreadsheets last month.
Lex (05:24):
Yeah, but that’s like, okay. I know people who are, like, actually, shared taste in music is my love language. No, making a really sexy spreadsheet, like, that is Jordan’s love language. 

Jordan:
Horrifically, it is. 

Lex:
It’s that. It’s the boxes. It’s the organization. It’s the formulas.
Jordan (05:39):
It’s the being able to color code and outsource having to make sense of information. And also- 

Lex:
I cannot wait. But I love that for you. 

Jordan:
Kind of redeeming myself for getting a BFA is having some Excel skills too. But anyways, I did make a lot of Excel spreadsheets. We have some cool things coming at you first and foremost, by the time this episode drops, we will have all of our transcripts up for every single episode.

Lex:
Woop, woop! 

Jordan:
So, those will be available on our Buzzsprout site. Those will be available as well on a brand shiny new section of our website where we will have those, as well as other news about what we’re up to, about other things that are going on in the ADHD world, about other podcasts that we get are [inaudible]
Lex (06:28):
We’re going to have- our networking is just going to be right out there in the open. You’ll see who’s come on our podcast and you’ll see if we’re going on someone else’s podcast. Like, we will feature, like exciting news like that. Like when we get a new guest. Or when we post a Tiktok. ‘Cause we do also have a Tiktok. 

Jordan:
Oh yeah, I forgot about that one. 

Lex:
Well, I’m the one in charge of it now. 

Jordan:
This is true, this is true. 

Lex:
Which- I don’t know what Jordan was thinking. Jordan asked me to run the Tiktok and that’s on them. So, like, y’all know that. I just need everyone to know that Jordan did give me control of the Tiktok.
Jordan (06:58):
And I stand by it because- 

Lex:
It’s a bold move on your part- 

Jordan:
Tiktok is a chaos zone and you are a chaos deity. 

Lex:
Oh, thank you. 

Jordan:
You’re so welcome. I love you, bro.
Lex (07:09):
I love you so much, bro. Anyways. Anything else exciting you want to fire away? Or should we, uh, hop right on over to our favorite station?
Jordan (07:18):
Is it our favorite station? 

Lex:
I mean, education [inaudible]. 

Jordan:
It’s a good station.
Lex: (07:22):
I love the dopamine trampoline. That’s not a station. It’s a trampoline. 

Jordan:
That’s true, that’s true. 

Lex:
You know? Like, if it’s, like, bits of our podcast. Yeah, no, not my fav to be frank.
Jordan: (07:31):
So, it’s kind of our favorite station by default. I’ll take it.
Lex (07:33):
Yeah. It’s, like, the only station. So, it’s also our least favorite station. 

Jordan:
We could come up with another station. 

Lex:
Maybe. I don’t know. Just tell me what we’re learning today though. Let’s just go. Let’s do that part. We are at the station. And we do like it here.
Jordan (07:49):
We do like it here, and today at the station, at the education station, we are going to be diving into the question ‘what is neurodiversity?’ Yeah, it’s a big question and-

Lex:
It’s a chunky boy. 

Jordan:
It is a very, very hefty, hefty boy. And it’s not a question that actually has concrete answers yet, but we thought that it’s worth discussing because a) it’s a term that is super, super commonly used and thrown around, especially in communities like the ADHD and neurodivergent Twitter community, online other, other places that are not Twitter, as well, the other websites that I know all of the names of.
Lex (08:30):
On the rest of the internet, whatever that may be. Yeah. I personally really liked the neurodivergent community on Neopets.
Jordan (08:40):
I bet you do. [Laughter] And also because it is autism acceptance month, it is, we felt, worth the time to sort of acknowledge the roots of the neurodiversity movement and give a little bit more history on where that concept came from. And then we, as a community, can have a better idea of where it’s going.
Lex (09:01):
Hell yeah, I’m in it. I’m excited. Let’s do this. Hit me with that snare. 

Jordan:
Ba-dum tss! 

Lex:
Okay. Thank you. And now, now do hit me with information.
Jordan (09:10):
Yes. So the word neurodiversity, as you can probably guess by the parts of it, means different brains and more specifically, it means a way of viewing people who have, what are otherwise seen as, neurological disabilities. Uh, this originally started with autism, but now often includes, uh, dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, uh, OCD, other things like ADHD as well, viewing all of those things as a normal and valuable difference in brain structure rather than a disability. So, that builds in sort of a two-fold perspective of articulating that those ways of thinking and behaving and having your brain be are just different and not lesser. And also a huge component of neurodiversity in the neurodiverse movement is advocating for accommodations, for people to function in quote, unquote neurotypical society rather than, like, cures. And that ties into the social model of disability, which is viewing it as a symptom of the way that society is built, as not having accommodations versus society being the right and natural thing and people who are neurodiverse, just being wrong for it. Does that make sense?
Lex (10:32):
Yeah. No. So, I guess, uh, I have questions and I know we can get into it, but basically, or let me see if I can give you, like, the watered down version of everything you just said. 

Jordan:
Please do. 

Lex:
Okay. Neurodiversity, when it comes down to it, is, uh, something that is used as an identifier for people who have brains that are different from what society considers quote, unquote normal. 

Jordan:
Yes. 

Lex:
So, different brains. It sounds pretty cut and dry, but I know that, that it’s not, I know that that’s not the case.
Jordan (11:01):
It does kind of do what it says on the tin. Of course there are some pros and cons. Pros are that just taking a non pathologizing approach to viewing these things rather than calling them disorders, looking at it through that social model as really conducive to empowering people and removing that stigma and advocating for accommodations. It is an opportunity to view diversity in brain structure and function as having the same potential for, you know, cultural enrichment and creative potential as other types of diversity. So, like, in other situations where we want a diverse set of viewpoints and those enrich the conversation and those are important and necessary. Adding diversity of the way that your brain functions is also valuable in that sense. There are cons as well. I mean, some people, especially in the autistic community, I’ve read, uh, which is where this concept originated, feel like this doesn’t truly represent people who have higher support needs ‘cause people argue that accommodations and the way society is built is a factor. But when people physically can’t live on their own and need support, that’s harder, I guess, for them to see that as a societal thing. So, people feel like it falls short of really representing of that experience.
Lex (12:23):
Yeah. No, I mean, neurodiversity is a spectrum. That’s why it’s not just, different brain from, like, the standard, it’s diverse in and of itself as well. 

Jordan:
Yeah, absolutely. Absolutely. 

Lex:
Which I think leads to a lot of confusion, like, myself included. As to who is and who is not neurodivergent. Who can claim that, who can’t. I think that sometimes, especially, like, in our very online sort of society and culture right now that can be kind of hard to parse, right? Because, like, I’ve seen a lot of people assume that neurodivergent means that you literally have any sort of different brain. And that includes, like, anxiety disorders, major depressive disorder. Like, and I personally don’t know what the correct quote, unquote answer is. Like, I’ve talked about this before. Like, I think that labels are helpful, but not always necessary and not always- or, like, they can be helpful to a point, but everything has pros and cons and anyways, so- but I do think there is a lot of confusion about, like, is neurodiversity just for people on, like, the spectrum of autism and ADHD and dyslexia, or does it include quote, unquote, like, the rest of the mental disorders and mental illnesses? I don’t know. So, I think that would be, like, one question that I’d have for you and, like, what your research showed. ‘Cause, like, I know that culturally there seems to be a lot of different ideas about what neurodiversity means it is. And I’m assuming it was similar in research, but I was curious to see if you did find anything neat.
Jordan (13:57):
I’m gonna say that I sure wish that I had an answer for you that was cut and dry, but I don’t. And my guess just from my research is mostly just because this is- I was surprised to learn- this is actually a fairly new movement. This is a fairly new way of defining and categorizing. And this is a fairly new lens to view those experiences from. The term neurodivergent or neurodiverse was coined in 1998.
Lex (14:26):
Yeah. I mean, you say that it hasn’t been that long. That is over two decades ago.
Jordan (14:30):
It is, but that’s, like, literally the first time this word appeared in print and-
Lex (14:35):
I don’t know, I guess with all our talk of, like, the DSM and how ADHD wasn’t even called ADHD in 1998. So, I don’t know, it makes sense to me. But it is weird that, like, neurodivergent, like, different brain- hasn’t been, like, like, scientifically used elsewhere.
Jordan (14:52):
Yeah. That’s fair. I think, I mean, obviously I’m not like a sociologist or anything, but I think part of the difference is that because it’s a part of disability rights it’s gone at the pace that disability rights has, not at the pace that modern psychiatry has.
Lex (15:09):
Well, that’s what I’m saying.

Jordan:
Just in terms of acceptance. 

Lex:
I’m not surprised. Like, I’m not surprised. I guess is, like, the- yeah. 

Jordan (15:17):
That’s fair. But yeah, so it was coined in 1998 by a sociologist named Judy Singer, who herself identifies as on the autistic spectrum. We love and respect self-diagnosis in this house. And was originally defined as a way of understanding differences in the human brain regarding sociability, learning, attention, mood, and other mental function. So, those are kind of the criteria they were looking at neurodivergence on and as well, there is sort of a scientific component of all of those things that fall under the category of neurodivergent. As we understand often, like, there are studies to suggest that there is actually a physical difference in brain structure. So, part of it is rooted in that from the sociological perspective of Judy Singer, those are kind of the elements of- this person experiences this, or does this, or has different capabilities, and these elements are considered neurodiverse. And she wrote a book and in her book said, “for me, the key difference of the autism spectrum lies in its call for an anticipation of a politics of neurological diversity or neurodiversity, the neurologically different represent a new addition to the familiar political category of class, gender, and race, and will augment the insights of the social model of disability.” So, it came out of, specifically, the autistic community and, specifically, like, autism advocacy and, specifically, a perspective of viewing things through the social model of disability. So, that’s, like, the history of it, but in the original definition, by Judy Singer, it’s the sociability, the learning, attention, mood, are the things that she names. Does that answer your question at all?
Lex (17:04):
Yeah, no. I, I think that helps to see, like, where the movement originated, right? And where- it makes sense why different people think different things about it. Also, sorry. I’m, like, sweating because of how much cramping is happening right now. I’m so sorry. 

Jordan:
I’m so sorry, bro. 

Lex:
Um, I’m like, I’m good. I’m ready to soldier on. But, like, I just want to let you know, like, that’s why I’m, like, not being funny and quippy. ‘Cause I am a little bit, like- 

Jordan:
Oh, we’ll get through this. We’ll get through this.

Lex:
Like, my, I can, like, feel sweat dripping down my face right now. That’s really gross. I know it’s like a big part of it is just like, ouch. 

Jordan:
Yeah. We’re very close to the end of the education station. 

Lex:
I just wanted to let you know that, like, I don’t hate you and this is great. And I’m having a, I’m not having a good time right now, but, like, not because of the podcast with you. 

Jordan:
Yeah. What did you eat? 

Lex:
Oh, I mean, ‘cause I’ve had that like a couple of times over the past, like, month and this hasn’t happened, but I got one of the grilled cheeses from Starbucks. But, like, I’ve had a couple of those over the past month. 

Jordan:
Oh, bro. Was it the McFlurry? 

Lex:
I don’t want it to be the McFlurry but it- bro. 

Jordan:
Are you hurt, bro? Oh, buddy. Yikes, buddy. 

Lex:
In case this ends up- some context. I’m allergic to dairy, but I really love it. 

Jordan:
Yeah. I can’t blame you there, bud. 

Lex:
And I ate just, just straight dairy.
Jordan (18:26):
You sure did, bud. Yeah, you had a grilled che- it’s probably a combination of the grilled cheese and the McFlurry and the feta, um, although feta’s sheep’s milk isn’t it?
Lex (18:36):
Uh, no, it depends. 

Jordan (18:39):
Okay, well it might’ve been. Anyways, let’s, let’s, let’s finish this podcast. You don’t have to suffer in sweat. It’s also definitely worth noting that a lot of credit is also due to Jim Sinclair who is currently alive and active autism advocate. They were one of the first people to publicly articulate the idea that autism should be viewed as a difference rather than a disease. They also were one of the original founders of the Autism Network International. So, that’s pretty dope. Credit where credit is due. Yeah. So, that’s basically the history of where the term neurodivergent comes from. Because of its relative youth in the field of mental health. I think that that’s a huge contributor to why we’re still kind of working out a definition and feeling out what that encompasses and what that means in practical application. But it’s the general view that differences in brain structure and the differences in behavior that they cause are just a natural human genetic variation and not a disease or a disorder or something to cure. And I think it’s cool too, that practically speaking this idea of neurodivergency helps create a lot of-
Lex (20:01):
This idea of neurodiversity. Sorry.
Jordan (20:04):
Thank you. I knew I was going to get it wrong. 

Lex:
It’s okay, I’ve got you. 

Jordan:
This idea of neurodiversity helps create a lot of, sort of, like, intergroup solidarity and it’s very practically, like, advocates for accommodations and actual tangible things you can do to not only make life easier for neurodivergent people, but make their contribution to society more valued. And also I think it has a lot of, like, emotional help too in that concept fighting against the stigma of these things. So, that’s what I got.
Lex (20:40):
Yeah. Thank you so much. It’s great to hear some more, like, concrete history about it. ‘Cause I know for my part, like, you go on Twitter and you look around and people are just, like, I don’t want to say throwing the word around irresponsibly ‘cause I don’t want to speak for other people.
Jordan (20:56):
But it’s not super clear what it means. Unless you want to really, like, stick your hands into that moon sand.
Lex (21:02):
Yes. And, and I think the fact that a lot of times it’s sort of just, like, thrown out, like, ND, like, I have some sort of disorder or mental illness or disability, or just have a different brain. You know, and this is a good catch-all term for it, but I know that it wasn’t necessarily created as a catch-all term. So, there’s some conflict there I think. That people who are smarter than me have, have addressed and have, like, talked about, I think. But that was like a big thing that I noticed when I was, like, trying to get a read on what we would sort of be digging into, right, with this episode. And, like, I know we’re not, like, really digging super deep ‘cause it’s just the two of us pea brains just doing our best. And truth be told-
Jordan (21:47):
That is certainly a different brain.
Lex (21:49):
Yeah. And truth be told I have IBS and I’m allergic to dairy and I did make the tragic mistake of eating a McFlurry a few hours ago and, uh, that invoice has come in. That bill is due. So, I do, I do apologize, dear audience, that I’m not, uh, super sunshiny and full of goofs, but Jordan can tell you, my face is just, like, sweaty right now.
Jordan (22:11):
I can’t actually tell you that ‘cause it’s very dark in this blanket fort. But I believe you when you say it. The blessing and the curse of it finally warming up in Chicago. Anyways, we can, we can keep this going and our hope too, regardless of how much you’re about to poop yourself, is that this is the beginning of a conversation. Not the be all, end all of it. So we’ll keep that going, but tell me what you are feeling.

Lex (22:35):
Oh, do you mean, like, what’s giving me dopamine or do you mean, like, about neurodiversity?
Jordan (22:39):
I mean, did you have other thoughts on neurodiversity that you wanted to share?
Lex (22:43):
Yeah, I mean, I’m feeling pretty good about everything you just told me, and I feel smarter for that. So, thanks. 

Jordan:
You’re so welcome. 

Lex:
I always love to add information into my abyssal hole of a brain where things just go to die. So, it is kind of nice to add something new and fresh in there.
Jordan (23:01):
I was wondering where you were going to go with that phrase, but I’m glad it was abyssal hole of a brain.
Lex (23:06):
So, I mean, when it really comes down to it, I guess I’m feeling, as someone with ADHD, and I’ve never been diagnosed with autism, and I am not at a point where I feel comfortable self-diagnosing myself with autism. But I do have a lot of, like, those shared traits. And some traits that are autism specific. I do have some of those sometimes, or not sometimes, like, so, I feel pretty confident in, like, just from having ADHD, but also just, like, adding all that little flavoring in. That little flavor packet of-
Jordan (23:40):
Shake that ramen seasoning on over that ADHD.
Lex (23:42):
Yes. Yes. Yeah. All that said, I feel pretty confident in saying that I am neurodiverse. 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
So, it’s cool to learn about the history of that and learn a little bit more of the context there, but it is also, like, I still, even though, like, I am in that- included in the definitions that we’ve talked about- I still am, like, well, I don’t know. And then I think that’s just me being skittish of, like, wanting to commit to, like, labels or- and not to sound hippy dippy about it. I just literally, like, things change so often, and words change so often that I’m just, like, sometimes labels just make me feel like I’m being performative about everything. And, like, I know that there’s philosophically something to be said about a lot of existence being performative, but that’s a completely different, uh- that’s not even this podcast. That’s a separate podcast entirely, probably. So, um- 

Jordan:
Oh God, that sounds dense. 

Lex:
I guess, all that said, the feeling that is coming from my brain and the words that I’m saying as I’m processing them out loud with you and our beloved audience. Um, confusion. But, like, just, like, a healthy dose, a healthy dose of confusion. 

Jordan:
Okay. 

Lex:
Does that make se- like, everything you said makes sense. That’s cool. I learn new things and I think what you- you know what you said of, like, there’s no clear answer, there’s still no clear answer and we, we can’t provide that. And so, like, yup. So, there’s still that sort of, like, okay. 

Jordan:
Okay. 

Lex:
But we’re not psychiatrists, or- 

Jordan:
We sure aren’t.

Lex:
Fancy brain docs or- 

Jordan:
We sure aren’t.

Lex:
Or anything. So, I feel pretty okay. And just stand- sitting in that.

Jordan:
Yeah.

Lex:
Like, I don’t know.
Jordan (25:14):
That’s definitely a lot to think about. 

Lex:
How are you feeling? 

Jordan:
My initial reaction is kind of along those same lines of what it means to define or seek a diagnosis, like, for ADHD in terms of, I understand some purposes of a diagnosis, but if you feel like the tools help you, if you feel like the community makes you feel supported, if you feel like that’s working for you, then, like-

Lex:
Nice. 

Jordan:
Nice. But I feel the same way about, like, identifying as neurodivergent, I guess. ‘Cause I’m certainly not the sort of person who can say, like, yes, you are or no, you are not. I, the queen of neurodiversity, knight thee for autism.
Lex (25:59):
The divergency period. 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
Well, what kind of costume was that? Are those period costumes? Oh, yeah. It’s actually from the divergency era.
[Laughter]

Jordan:
It’s like solar punk, but, like, kind of shitty. [Laughter] It’s like solar punk, but mostly tinfoil. [Laughter]

Lex:
Sorry, that got me. [Laughter]

Jordan:
Because I was like, that was stupid.

Lex:
[Inaudible] funny. 

Jordan:
Thanks, bro. 

Lex:
Nice.
Jordan (26:27):
Yeah. 

Lex:
Thanks. 

Jordan:
Thank you. 

Lex:
You got something?
Jordan (26:31):
What?

Lex:
Yeah. What, what- you got anything else? Or should we do some bouncing? 

Jordan:
Let’s bounce! How many songs? How many already copyrighted songs are we going to bring into this, this episode? 

Lex:
Oh, I was just imitating genre for you.
Jordan (26:47):
Oh.

Lex:
Imitating. 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
[Singing] Bounce. Anyways. Yeah. 

Jordan:
Let’s hop on over. What do you got for the dopamine trampoline on our triumphant return to podcasting?
Lex (26:57):
Well, this is a short and sweet DT on my part. Uh, I thought about maybe bringing, you know, some things that I’ve really gotten into like, uh, Animal Crossing. I finally got a Switch so I got into animal crossing, Uh, or, you know, Survivor, I really have gotten into Survivor. It is a hot mess and it’s a bad show, but I- oh boy, howdy- I do enjoy it. 

Jordan:
It’s such a bad show. 

Lex:
It’s so bad. I just watched the season 13 Cook Islands show, otherwise known as Survivor: Race Wars. [Laughter] It’s not the actual title, but it is so bad. It is so bad. And,  like, I don’t know. I think it’s just, uh, sometimes watching reality TV just- and I think it’s kind of like what a lot of people watch reality TV for and it’s kind of like, well, at least I’m not fucking up that bad. 

Jordan:
That’s fair. That’s fair. I keep getting updates of living, like, I think the next level back of that, I keep getting updates on Real Housewives of New Jersey from my coworkers. Oh, that’s also a thing that we did in the month break, is, I got  a new job.
Lex (27:57):
We did. I, Jordan did.

Jordan:
Couldn’t have done it without you, babe.

Lex:
Jordan got a new job. Well, yeah. I mean, I guess I helped with moral support.

Jordan:
You did.

Lex:
But, like, you did get the job-

Jordan:
I did get the job.

Lex:
On your own and you’re very qualified and it’s awesome. It’s great. Uh, and Jordan also works from home now. So, when I, when I get home from work, the cats are excited to see me, but not like horrifying little goblins that haven’t had attention all day. ‘Cause there’s been another person in the house.
Jordan (28:23):
They’ve been horrifying goblins for attention all day up until then. [Laughter] Ned got so upset with me today because I got a new chair. This is ADHD related. 

Lex:
Yeah.
Jordan (28:34):
Uh, I got a new chair, got one of those kneeling chairs that you can, like, rock on and fidget, and it is dope as hell. But unlike my office rolly standard chair I had before, it doesn’t have a back because it’s dual. And that means that Ned couldn’t jump up on my chair and sit right behind me like he used to, and he threw a fit. He threw a fit in the sunroom and was meowing and, like, pacing around the room and, like-
Lex (29:03):
Like, did he try to climb up and then realize it was your back?
Jordan (29:06):
He didn’t try and climb up, but he would, like, reach up on the back of the stool and, like, reach up, like he was trying to get up, but couldn’t and kept doing that until I pulled over the old office chair right next to me, for him to sit in while I worked.
Lex (29:29):
He’s so stupid. 

Jordan:
I know. 

Lex:
I love him. 

Jordan:
I love him so much.
Jordan (29:31):
But yeah. So, that’s, that’s been my life recently. That’s what I got. But what do you got, what do you got for us today? I’m sorry [inaudible]

Lex:
Yeah, sorry. I, I mean, I was sort of just, I was going to do something chunky and then I was like, you know what? That takes a lot of effort and we just got off a break. So, I don’t know about y’all, but, like, I don’t write my best essays right after spring break. You know what I mean? Um, so short and sweet. I got, uh, my Christmas stocking this month because I hadn’t seen my family for seven months and I was finally able to safely go visit, um, and meet my nephew who had been born in that time period. Uh, it was, it was awesome. [Inaudible] It was awesome. A great time and I really needed that. Um, but that said, I got my stocking and Christmas presents and birthday presents and, like, all the things that had been missed, right, over the past seven months and in my stocking were, like, some candy things, some small gift things. And, like, one thing was just this pack of, like, ten different chapsticks. And it wasn’t like a giant, like, bulk Costco pack of Burt’s Bees or something. It was, like, some off-brand Stranger Things merch chapstick. And so it’s just a giant pack of chapsticks.
Jordan (30:47):
Like, imagine the Lip Smackers- 

Lex:
Yeah-

Jordan:
Multi-flavor packs.

Lex:
Yes.

Jordan:
For anybody who is wanting a visual or, like, can’t get their mind off with Costco. It was like that.
Lex (30:57):
Yeah. Yeah, and, like, imagine you see that variety pack and every single separate chapstick is a separate flavor and also has separate artwork on each thing. And you know, how some chapsticks it’s fruit, or, like, little bees or, like, honey. Wow. I’m really fixated on Burt’s Bees, huh? But every chapstick has a, a different character from Stranger Things that-
Jordan (31:21):
The detail is, like, honestly, really impressive.
Lex (31:23):
No, it is. It is. But I look at this giant pack of chapstick in my Christmas stocking and I’m like, I mean, I do like chapstick, but I don’t necessarily- like, I have, I have my Burt’s Bees and I’ve got, you know, my overnight moisture stuff and, yeah. So, I was like, okay, maybe I should just, like, donate this or, you know, I’m sure there’s some, like, little kid who would go bonkers for some Stranger Things chapsticks. And so I was just going to, like, donate it so I didn’t open it at all. ‘Cause I was like, it’s fine. And then my partner comes over and I’m showing them, like, all the stuff I got. And then he’s like, oh, oh baby, you can’t donate these. And I was like, why not? Is it, like, I haven’t opened them. Like, it should be okay. Like, I figure someone’s going to need it. And he goes, no, no, because you need this chapstick. And he opens the pack and he pulls a chapstick out of the- I didn’t look at- quite frankly. ‘Cause I saw the- I was like, yeah, because I’m a, you know, or like me a 28-year-old adult is going to carry around chapstick with children on it. [Inaudible]

Jordan:
I was gonna say chapstick is chapstick. But then when you put it that way, it is a-

Lex:
No, like, you’re holding a, and you’re rubbing it on your mouth and, like, I feel like there’s, it’s weird enough that there’s a person on the chapstick. But, like, extra weird that it’s just children. And-

Jordan:
A fair point. 

Lex:
And so Abraham opens the package and then pulls one out and it’s a light pink color. I hadn’t really noticed it. It’s a light pink color. And it has, uh, David Harbour as chief of Hawkins police, uh, our favorite, you know, rogue cop.

Jordan:
Mhmm.
Lex (33:13):
Who’s a horrible cop. And for that, we love him. 

Jordan:
Yeah.

Lex:
Uh, but it’s, it’s good old Chief Hopper, Chief Jim Hopper in his season three get-up with the floral button-up.

Jordan:
The really iconic Hawaiian shirt. 

Lex:
Yes. So, it’s, it’s a picture of him in that outfit on a pale pastel, like, millennial pink tube and then, get this, the flavor- 

Jordan:
The flavor-

Lex:
Root beer. So, someone made a chapstick specifically tailored to my interests. This is proof that we’re in a simulation, in my opinion. 

Jordan:
Like a chapstick hat trick. 

Lex:
Exactly. So, I’m obsessed with this chapstick. It doesn’t taste like root beer, really. It tastes like the root beer candies, like the root beer barrel candies and, like, it’s fun. It’s cool. But mostly I’m just obsessed with the fact that I have David Harbour on a chapstick now. Um, and then the other chapsticks, I- depending on, like, the flavor, like, I’m just going to take the picture- like, I realized you can just peel the picture off and it will just be, like, a plastic tube. So, I am going to use them because I always need chapstick. But, like, I’m sorry to the child that I took all of those- children- chapsticks away from, but I-
Jordan (34:23):
It’s your Christmas present. I feel like you’re justified in using them
Lex (34:27):
I guess. And also, I couldn’t say no to chief police.
Jordan (34:31):
It’s, it’s David Harbour as chief of police Jim Hopper and his tropical shirt.

Lex:
Mm.

Jordan:
Millennial pink.

Lex:
Mm.

Jordan:
Root beer. 

Lex:
Mm.

Jordan:
That’s like, that’s really like three dopamine trampolines in one. It was like a triple bounce.

Lex (34:45):
Mhmm. People who know me in real life probably know that I am, um, inappropriately attracted to David Harbour. One might say, uh, inappropriately so. I will, I will admit to that. Um, and if for some reason you ever hear this podcast, I’m kidding, David. I’m kidding. 

Jordan:
It’s completely appropriate. 

Lex:
Let’s put on the BoJack theme song, see where it takes us. So, um, there it is, that’s my dopamine trampoline. What’s yours?
Jordan (35:11):
Well, I had to just hear that. So, I don’t think that there’s any joy left in my body. But-
Lex (35:14):
That’s false and you know it. [Laughter]
Jordan (35:19):
No, I, I do have a big old dopamine trampoline. This one’s like an OG one for me. It’s getting warm here in Chicago. It was like 80 degrees today. It’s starting to feel like summer. I’m wearing shorts. And so today my dopamine trampoline is the ultimate summer treat. The ice cream of the future, Dippin’ Dots. Yes. I love Dippin’ Dots so much.
Lex (35:46):
You do not have to convince me. I am hopping on that train with you right now. [Laughter]
Jordan (35:51):
Thank you so much. For everyone at home, for our audience. I hope that you know how deeply, how deeply I love Dippin’ Dots. They’re so good. And the flavors are good. Like, all the flavors are good. None of them are bad. It’s not like an ice cream flavor. You’re like, well, that’s the one I like, all of them are good. And it’s just a top tier sensory experience to eat because it’s the little round ice cream dots and they’re good like that. And they’re so cold and we’ll get to that. We’ll get to that. But then you get them in that little plastic cup. You’re usually out at, like, Silverwood or the aquarium or something like that, somewhere fun.
Lex (36:29):
Yeah. For my ilk, my, my section of the country, [inaudible] Cedar Point. 

Jordan:
Yeah.

Lex:
Cedar Point.
Jordan (36:36):
Yeah. Silverwood for those views from the semi rural Pacific Northwest.
Lex (36:42):
The panhandle of Idaho. 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
If you’re not in the 25 mile square area around.
Jordan (36:49):
I feel like Silverwood was a cultural touchstone of, like, Tri-Cities life and that’s solidly in. 

Lex:
Oh, okay, okay.

Jordan:
There aren’t any closer theme parks. 

Lex:
I’m sorry. I derailed you. 

Jordan:
It’s okay. 

Lex:
Continue.

Jordan:
Anyways, you get the environment is just always good memories and it’s usually warm out and then they, like, kind of start to melt and so you get, like, a slightly textured, slightly starting-to-melt mouth joy. And I think they’re good. And also they’re interesting. Like, the history of Dippin’ Dots is fascinating. They were invented in the late eighties. The guy-
Lex (37:20):
That tracks. That tracks so hard.
Jordan (37:24):
Yeah. Like, the colors [inaudible]
Lex (37:26):
Well, I’m gonna shut up. I’m pretty sure everything you say about it- I’m like, yeah, that makes sense.
Jordan (37:28):
It really does. You’re not going to be surprised by any of this. I have a lot of fun facts. None of them are new facts, but they’re all fun. Anyways, they’re invented in 1987 by a guy named Curt Jones. He was a microbiologist. He was researching how to quick-freeze yogurt bacteria for use in animal feed. That was his day job. His night, like, passion, like, what lit his heart aflame in the nighttime hours was making ice cream. And I feel like it’s a fairly well known thing, not just for, like, food science nerds like me that, like, freezing ice cream with liquid nitrogen is a thing. Yeah. So, this guy, Curt Jones, like, megamind ice cream king was like, well, I got this nitrogen that I’m making cool yogurt stuff with. And I got this ice cream that I need to freeze anyways. And so he invented the process of dotting the ice cream of making Dippin’ Dots. Dippin’ Dots are made. Do you know what temperature Dippin’ Dots are made at?

Lex:
Just tell me, I’m not gonna be able to guess. 

Jordan:
Negative 320 degrees Fahrenheit.
Lex (38:30):
Yeah. There’s no way I would have guessed that. So, thank you for just coming out with it.
Jordan (38:36):
They have to be stored at negative 40 degrees, which I believe is colder than the Moderna COVID vaccine. But we’ll get to that too. You know what else is negative 320 degrees? To put this into a little bit of context for everybody. The planet Uranus. [Laughter]
Lex (38:51):
Yeah. Okay. Nice. Yeah. [Laughter] We are adults with sophisticated tastes, and we are very serious and eloquent. 

Jordan:
We sure are. 

Lex:
And I definitely don’t think that no [inaudible] Uranus is funny. [inaudible] [laughter] It was, like, kind of a joke. I did, like, the jokey, like, high-school stoner laugh that I can sometimes pull off, but then I was like, oh no, I can’t [inaudible] that’s usually funny.
Jordan (39:59):
Snake kind of just ate its own tail there. You know what is funny and kind of a, like, not high school way though, but just in, like, actually very sweet, charming way? The Dippin’ Dots machine is apparently called the DotBot3000. Isn’t that great? I know. 
Lex (40:17):
Hey DotBot3000, we’re going to send you to Uranus. Stop. [Laughter]
Jordan (40:21):
She makes 50 million dots a day. 

Lex:
She deserves a vacation. 

Jordan:
She does. 

Lex:
I’m insisting upon it. 

Jordan:
I wonder if they call her Dottie. 

Lex:
Maybe. 

Jordan:
I would. I think I will. I’ll call her Dottie. For a little bit of context, she makes 50 million dots a day. There are 2000 Dippin dots approximately- they don’t count them out- per five ounce cup. So, like think of all the dot work, think of all the work that Dottie did for you next time you eat a cup of Dippin’ Dots.
Lex (40:47):
Yeah. I mean, I’ve never eaten Dippin’ Dots and been like, wow, this isn’t a modern marvel. This isn’t absolutely batshit that I’m eating [bleep] cryogenically frozen fish eggs painted pretty colors. That’s what I, like- there’s no, there’s no part of me that’s ever ingested Dippin’ Dots and been like, this is totally normal food.
Jordan (41:06):
There’s no way to forget that it is a miracle of modern science.
Lex (41:09):
Yeah, no, it’s just incredible. Uh, the flavor, the experience, the texture. The existential sort of hope that it inspires.
Jordan (41:20):
Yeah, it’s an experience. It really, it really is the ice cream of the future. It’s like the ice cream of a better tomorrow. 

Lex:
Yeah. What was the person’s name again? Who invented Dippin’ Dots? 

Jordan:
Curt Jones.
Lex (41:30):
Curt Jones? Yeah, so, like, Curt Jones could get us to Mars. 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
Elon Musk could not get us Dippin’ Dots.
Jordan (41:37):
Yeah. Absolutely. 

Lex:
Elon Musk also can’t get us to Mars. 

Jordan:
Yeah. [Inaudible] He can’t do either.
Lex (41:43):
This is, this is my funny way of shitting on Elon Musk. 

Jordan:
No, that’s fairly [inaudible] 

Lex:
Curt Jones, unless Curt Jones is problematic. Then in that case, I take it back. Covered our bases. Boom.
Jordan (41:53):
Fair enough. You know, it is a good business decision though. Unlike trying to go to Mars and ruining astronomy for everyone else. DD Cryogenics, which is a whole side company that Dunkin Donuts- Dunkin Donuts, [bleep] sideways, Dippin’ Dots- which is a whole side company that Dippin’ Dots has to sell the technology that they use to make Dippin’ Dots, to other industries. Like, they came up with something good and they shared that with the world and you can go buy, like, giant freezer trucks from them.

Lex:
Yeah.

Jordan:
And they’re so- sorry, go ahead.
Lex (42:25):
Well, I was saying that one of these, I think what you’re getting to, is vaccines. It’s been really helpful. The Dippin’, Dippin’ Dots technology has been lifesaving. 

Jordan:
Literally. 

Lex:
So [bleep] chew on that, okay? 

Jordan:
Okay. Okay. Let those melt in your mouth. Dang it.
Lex (42:41):
Well, make sure everyone else gets, gets the vaccine in the way that it properly needs to be administered.

Jordan:
Yeah. Don’t let the vaccine melt in your mouth [inaudible]

Lex:
Like, but then, you know, maybe once everyone is, like, good to go and they have extra doses, you know, maybe you can just be like, can you just put it in my mouth? And, like, I don’t think you should, but, like, you could ask.
Jordan (42:58):
I wonder if they could make vaccine Dippin’ Dots. They make coffee Dippin’ Dots. Did you know that? It’s called 40 Below Joe, and it’s just, like, straight espresso Dippin’ Dots.
Lex (43:07):
I mean, like, here’s the thing. I know you said that the- every flavor of Dippin’ Dots tastes the same. I wouldn’t know that because I strictly only ever get the rainbow fruity ones.

Jordan:
Mmm.

Lex:
Because it’s the only fruity flavor that they, like, almost always have everywhere. And it is so good. And it’s rainbow. So.
Jordan (43:22):
I do just for the sake of the recording want to say that I didn’t say they all taste the same. I said they all taste good, but yes, I see. 

Lex:
Sorry, yeah.

Jordan:
[inaudible] fruity, fruity flavors.

Lex (43:28):
Yeah. I just, like, I wouldn’t even know if the other ones even taste good ‘cause I’ve never- 

Jordan:
They do.

Lex:
Like, I believe you. I’m just letting our audience know that, like, I’m not an expert in this field. There is one flavor of Dippin’ Dots that I’ve always been true to. It’s, like, my one true love. Like the childhood sweetheart. I carry Dippin’ Dots with me.

Jordan:
You carry them in your heart?

Lex:
I carry Dippin’ Dots in my heart. 

Jordan:
Are you never without Dippin’ Dots? Anywhere you go, they go. Anyways, I hate that I knew enough of that poem to keep going. That’s fine. Speaking of Dippin’ Dots flavors though. I know you said that that’s your favorite flavor, but would you say that, like, that’s the flavor you are?
Lex (44:05):
I mean, I guess. I don’t really know. 

Jordan:
Do you want to find out? 

Lex:
Can I be assigned Dippin’ Dots?
Jordan (44:10):
You sure can. I have a [inaudible] Dippin’ Dots flavor?
Lex (44:17):
Dab [inaudible] Yeah. I don’t know.
Jordan (44:19):
Fab. And there’s a fab. Um, but yes. Good news for everybody. There is a ‘what Dippin’ Dots flavor are you?’ personality quiz on the Dippin’ Dots site. 

Lex:
Okay. 

Jordan:
So, this is official. 

Lex:
Cool, cool. 

Jordan:
There are not that many questions, but I’ll take these through and you just tell me.
Lex (44:36):
Okay. I’ll just go with my gut reaction. 

Jordan:
Yeah, yeah.

Lex:
I won’t be, like, trying to get a certain flavor. Also, I don’t even know, like, what you can-
Jordan (44:42):
Yeah.

Lex:
I dunno. 

Jordan:
You don’t know what the results are. Number one. What would you do if you saw your crush at the mall with someone else? 1) Assume they’re just friends. 2) Pour the rest of your drink over their head. 3) Freak out and call your best friend. 4) Confront them on the spot. Or 5) Who cares? I’m hotter.
Lex (45:02):
Thank you. With my crush at the mall? 

Jordan:
Mhmm.

Lex:
Okay. I’m going to go with hypothetical crush because this would be really- 

Jordan:
We can’t go to malls right now, at this point. 

Lex:
And this would just be a wild thing for me. ‘Cause, like, if it was my partner, I would just assume they were with, like, one of their many friends. You know, let’s go with, like, confront them on the spot. I’m going to be true to myself.
Jordan (45:22):
Okay. Question two. The movie you wanted to see is sold out. What do you do? 1) Storm out in a huff. 2) Call the police.
Lex (45:31):
Ew. Not that one.
Jordan (45:32):
No. 3) Oh well, pick another movie. 4) Refuse to leave until they give you a ticket. Or 5) Flirt with anyone who has a ticket.
Lex (45:41):
Oh well, pick another movie. Relax. Why are these all so angry?
Jordan (45:46):
Okay. Number three. Your phone dies in the middle of an important text and you can’t find the charger. Do you throw your phone across the room? [Laughter] No biggie. I’ll just talk to them later. 3) Blame everyone in your house for stealing your charger. 4) Flip your house upside down until you find your charger or lastly, borrow a charger from someone else.
Lex (46:09):
I mean, okay. I guess the first step for me would be borrow a charger from someone else, but then I probably would move on to flipping the house upside down, trying to find it. So, let’s go with borrow a charger though. Cause like, if it’s an important call, like, in that moment I’m just gonna be like, hey, can I borrow a charger? 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
Like, I have an iPhone.

Jordan:
That seems like- 

Lex:
Who doesn’t have a [bleep] iPhone charger. 

Jordan:
So, one reasonable response. [Laughter]

Lex:
Well, I mean, like, no biggie. I’ll talk to him later too. Like, that’s also fine.
Jordan (46:36):
That’s also fine. Next question. How do you react when your team loses the big game? 

Lex:
Oh boy. 

Jordan:
1) Don’t worry. We’ll get them next time. 2) Unplug your TV and cry. 3) This team stink. Pick another. [Laughter] 4) Yell at the TV until your throat’s sore because of a bad call. I hope you don’t do that. You need your voice. We have a podcast. Or lastly, get on Twitter. The world must feel your fury.
Lex (47:02):
Uh, I mean, I have- this one- I have a concrete answer. It is yell at the TV until my throat is sore ‘cause of a bad call. It is. Listen, listen. Watching Mexico in the World Cup, uh, 2018, I think. And I think it was, like, the France game. There was just a lot happening. And I remember being like, argh! Sorry. Anyways. 

Jordan:
Anyways.

Lex:
I just have to, I have to answer it- I said I’d answer it with my gut. 

Jordan:
Yeah. That’s true to you. 

Lex:
Yeah.
Jordan (47:30):
Okay, question five. Someone runs into you and spills their drink all over your new shirt. Side note. I think all of these are plots of episodes of Lizzie Macquire. But, do you punch that jerk’s lights out? Say no prob, bruh. Oh well. Go and buy a new one, or yell at them and make them cry.
Lex (47:50):
I mean, I guess it depends on what kind of drink. I mean, okay. It depends on, like, if I would just be like, I’m just going to get a new shirt or, like, it’ll wash out. ‘Cause if it’s not something that won’t wash out, then I wouldn’t just be like, that’s not a problem, but, like, I’m not going to yell at them and make them cry. And I’m not going to punch somebody.
Jordan (48:05):
For the sake of authenticity let’s say, like, a slushie.
Lex (48:07):
Like, Glee style, someone just, just- Oh, okay. Um, I would probably, okay. Again, I’m not trying to paint myself as a bad person, but, like, if we’re going on gut instinct, I would probably yell at them. They might cry as a result, but I can at least commit to yelling at them.
Jordan (48:22):
Cor- correlation may not imply causation there. Okay. Question six. You get 50 bucks for your birthday. What do you do with it? 1) Blow it all. 2) Complain. Those cheapskates didn’t give you enough. 3) Stash them bandz. And it’s important to note here that Bandz is spelled with a Z. 

Lex:
It’s Silly Bandz. 

Jordan:
I thought it meant like cash bands. You know, like the rubber bands you wrap around chunks of cash or Silly Bandz. It makes a lot of sense.
Lex (48:47):
Oh, I mean, it seems directed at children, so- oh, what’s that last one?
Jordan (48:52):
Rub it in your friends’ faces.
Lex (48:53):
You know, I’m going to say stash them Bandz. 

Jordan:
Stash them Silly Bandz? 

Lex:
Yeah. I’m just going to go on the assumption that it’s Silly Bandz. That’s the type of shit I would spend my money on.
Jordan (49:02):
That’s so fair. You’re playing an intramural game of Dodgeball. What’s your game plan? 

Lex:
To not be there. 

Jordan:
Okay. Throw it as hard as you can and hit those suckers in the face, hide behind the big guy, take a hit for your best friend so they can stay in, or take the first hit so you can be through with this nonsense.
Lex (49:20):
Oh, absolutely take the first hit so I can be through with this nonsense. This isn’t even a hypothetical. This happened all the time in high school where, like, I was friends with a lot of jocks. And so I would, like, get out really early so that I could, like, help throw the balls back to their side and stuff. Like- 

Jordan:
There you go. 

Lex:
I worked the things that I was better at.
Jordan (49:37):
So, we know that this is a really authentic answer then.
Lex (49:40):
Yeah, no, ‘cause it definitely happened multiple times and I hate Dodgeball. What the hell? Like, kickball I can stomach, but Dodgeball. You just beat the [bleep] out of other people, but with balls. And, like, while I respect that, personally it’s not my, um, forte. When it comes to, like, hurting people, using a plasticky, rubbery ball. That’s not my, that’s not my steez.
Lex (50:07):
Well, that, that makes sense because your result is stubborn, cautious, but ambitious. You stand your ground and don’t let anybody tell you what to do. You’re a cautious decision maker, but you stick to your guns and let everybody know it. You are mint chocolate. 

Lex:
Interesting. 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
Okay. 

Jordan:
I got strawberry. 

Lex:
Oh, that’s fun.

Jordan:
And this is the strawberry description. Kind of read me for a little bit of filth.
Lex (50:32):
Yeah. I mean, like, that felt kind of like a horoscope to me where it’s like, I can find things that I’m, like, oh yeah. But, like, okay.
Jordan (50:39):
Uh, strawberries was- aww, sweet strawberry. You are the bestest best friend ever. You give others the benefit of the doubt.
Lex (50:45):
That remains to be seen. 

Jordan:
Okay. Nevermind then.

Lex:
I’m just kidding.
Jordan (50:52):
You give others the benefit of the doubt. 

Lex:
I love you. 

Jordan:
Love you too. No matter how things-
Lex (50:55):
I love you, strawberry bro. 

Jordan:
I love you too, strawbro. 

Lex:
Strawberry bro.
Jordan (51:00):
Things might not always go your way, but you know that it’ll all work out in the end, which I think for this podcast, it is. The end. That’s all I had for my dopamine trampoline.
Lex (51:10):
Hell yeah, strawberry bros forever.
Jordan (51:12):
Strawberry bros forever, bro. [Inaudible] strawberry bros.
Lex (51:18):
Oh.
Jordan (51:21):
Sorry. I didn’t mean to injure you, bro.
Lex (51:23):
It’s okay. I was just like, aha. I have the same range as Jim Sturgis and across the universe. And then you were like [inaudible] Anyways, thank you all so much for coming back to join us on this, and I say this again and with all the love in my heart, shit for brains podcast where we still do in fact have shit for brains. And I mean, I still think there’s quite a lot to offer despite the shit brains. So, if you agree, leave a review, interact with us, send us some messages.
Jordan (51:54):
Oh, shoot. That was another thing I was supposed to say. That was an exciting new thing this month. If you leave us a review specifically on Podchaser from now until the end of the month- it’s April right now- so, until April 30th, for every review that you leave, they will donate 25 cents to Meals on Wheels. So, you can kind of knock two acts-of-kindness-birds with one review-stone there. Kind of lost that metaphor, but anyways-
Lex (52:17):
I mean you stuck it out to the end. You did commit to it. And I appreciate that. Yeah. But anyways. 

Jordan:
Let’s finish  this podcast- 

Lex:
Yeah, I got you, yeah. 

Jordan:
This has been Or, Learn Parkour from Wholehearted Production Company. 

Lex:
You can find us on Spotify, Apple podcasts, uh, Stitcher, you know, places where people find podcasts.
Jordan (52:36):
You know the drill at this point. Special thanks to Krizia Perito for our cover art design. You can find her at Petalhop. That’s P-E-T-A-L-H-O- P on Instagram and Etsy, and Twitter.
Lex (52:48):
Yeah. Thank you also to Tom Rosenthal for our intro and outro song, ‘There is a Dark Place’ off of the album Keep a Private Room Behind the Shop.
Jordan (52:56):
Follow us on the sosh meeds. We are at Or, Learn Parkour on Twitter. We are at Wearewpc on Instagram, and you can check out that shiny new news page on our website, wearewpc.com.
Lex (53:09):
Yeah. You can find those links as well as links to our brand new shiny transcripts, any sort of sources that we’ve used in this episode, and the music that we have in our episodes. And you can find all that good, good, delicious, gooey Dippin’ Dots flavor. You can find the links in the episode description. Go to the episode description. You’ll be able to find this stuff. 

Jordan:
You sure can. If you enjoy this podcast and want to hear more, don’t forget to subscribe to this feed. 

Lex:
Yeah, you can also support the show by just, like, word of mouth, honestly. Share with your friends, your family, your coworkers. I don’t know. Like, if anyone wants to maybe feel like they’ve got a handle on life, we could be a good, you know, kind of, like, how I say with reality TV. 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
That’s my suggestion this week. 

Jordan:
Yeah. 

Lex:
Sell it that way.
Jordan (53:54):
Perfect. 

Lex:
Yeah. And also, you know, leave us a review, like we said, and then we also do have a ko-fi if you feel so led. I totally get it if you can’t right now. Uh, but if you are able and you feel like it, we do have a ko-fi and you can find that in our link tree on Twitter and Instagram. 

Jordan:
You sure can. Do we have an outro question? 

Lex:
I mean, what is your favorite Dippin’ Dots flavor?

Jordan:
I feel like my favorite is probably the sundae one. 

Lex:
Nice. Yeah. 

Jordan:
I mean it varies. I, I branch out, I have a varied Dippin’ Dots life, but at the end of the day, the ice cream flavored ice cream. It’s really my jam. 

Lex:
Okay. Yeah. I already said mine’s rainbow [inaudible] it’s rainbow. I’m not gonna shit my pants at this point. So, that’s good. But I, I do need to go to the bathroom now. So, uh, love you. Bye.

Jordan:
I’m going to go get some ice cream. I’m Jordan.

Lex:
Oh, I’m Lex. 

Jordan:
And this has been Or, Learn Parkour. We’ll see you in two weeks. Bye!
Lex (55:20):
Bye! I am gonna go shit now [inaudible]

OLP 016: Strawberry Bros Forever – Transcript

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